Parlington Hall, Aberford, West Riding, Yorkshire, England oxburgh hall

Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk
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The Gatehouse & Moat; Spring Flowers; Gatehouse from the Inner Courtyard; Dormer Windows overlooking the Courtyard; Tudor Chimneys

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Views from the Gatehouse Tower 1, 2 & 5; Tower View & Moat Beyond 3; Castellations on the Tower.

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More Views from the Gatehouse Tower 1, 2; Spiral Stairway & Vaulted Ceiling in Gatehouse Tower; Modern Replacement Lead Rainwater Hopper; The North Front.

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West Front; Moat & Tower; West Front Closeup on Projecting Window; Sluece Valve to Control Water Flow in the Moat; Tower on South East Corner, with Two Storey Projecting Bay.

Oxburgh Hall

Once the home of the Bedingfield family, now part of the National Trust, the original structure was erected for Sir Edmund Bedingfield circa 1482, during the Wars of the Roses. Despite its castle like appearance it was never intended as fortifications, purely decorative, which it undoubtably is especially the magnificent brickwork.

The full colour guide book by the Trust tells of the heady days of the Tudor period when the Bedingfields were amongst the main players in high and dangerous politics. The second Sir Edmund guarded Henry the VIII's first queen, Catherine of Aragon. The family as Papists were persecuted by Elizabeth I and their later support for King during the Civil War saw them flee to France and Oxburgh came near to being raised to the ground by fire.

The medieval style of Oxburgh made it a fashionable home in the Victorian era, and in 1830 the 6th Baronet commisioned the architect J. C. Buckler to re-edify the hall adding new battlements and barleytwist chimneystacks to make it even more medieval. Also by this period England was more relaxed about catholics and a new neo-Gothic chapel was constructed in the grounds.

If you are an enthusiast of Tudor style brickwork this is a place worth visiting. I was unable to photograph inside the hall, but rest assured there is plenty to see in the magnificently decorated rooms.